THE LEGACY OF THE LEGEND
 
 

INTRODUCTION. ATTRACTIONS. MUSIC. MOVIES. TELEVISION. BOOKS.
MURDER SITES - VISITS TO [see below]; WALKING TOURS.  

                                                                          MURDER SITES - VISITS TO:
  At the time of the murders in 1888, crowds visited the sites where the victims were murdered -
  Buck`s Row, where Mary Ann Nichols was murdered;
  Hanbury Street, where Annie Chapman was murdered; 
  Berner Street, where Elizabeth Stride was murdered; 
  Mitre Square, where Catherine Eddowes was murdered;
  Dorset Street, off which was Miller`s Court, where Mary Jane Kelly was murdered.

 
  Visits to the murder sites were reported in the press.

                                   BUCK`S ROW: site of the murder of Mary Ann Nichols on Fri 31 Aug 1888
Daily News. 5 Sept 1888:
   from time to time during the day, they came in twos or threes and stopped at the top of the little paved opening... and gazed down at its gaudy gates...
   All through the day, little mobs of twenty or thirty people thronged round the window-sill under which the glare of the policeman`s bullseye had detected
  
the mutilated body... Fresh arrivals came up now and wanted to know all about it. Once more the supposed stains were pointed out... people stood and
   silently stared at the pavement and brickwork of the adjacent house,  and minutely examined the scratches and other marks on the wall.

Daily News
. 11 Sept 1888:
   From morning till night, crowds of people have been lounging about Buck`s-row, the scene of the previous murder.  A letter carrier... and a policeman, to
   whom I expressed a little surprise that crowds of sightseers should have come to Buck`s Row so long after the event, both remarked that the sightseers
   were there "because Monday is a holiday"...   Almost a hundred people - most of them, it is fair to say, of the loafer-class - were clustered round the big
   gate where [Mary] Ann Nichol`s body was found.

                               HANBURY STREET: site of the murder of Annie Chapman on Sat 8 Sept 1888
The Star. 8 Sept 1888:
   For several hours past, the occupants of the adjourning house [to 29 Hanbury St] have been charging an admission fee of one penny  to people anxious
   to view the spot where the body was found.  Several hundreds of people have availed themselves of this opportunity,  though all that can be seen are the
   couple of packing cases, from which is the stains of a blood track

The Times. 10 Sept 1888:
   When
the police came out of the house [29 Hanbury St] with the body, a large crowd, consisting of several hundreds of people, had assembled.  During
   the whole of last Saturday and Sunday,   a large crowd congregated in front of the house in Hanbury-street,  and the neighbours on either side did much
   business by making a small charge to persons who were willing to pay it to view from windows the yard in which the murder was committted.

Daily News. 10 Sept 1888:
   ... during a part of Saturday, people flocked in great numbers to see the blood stained spot in the yard [in Hanbury Street] paying a penny each.
Echo. 10 Sept 1888:
   Today, many persons are again visiting the locality of the crime [in Hanbury Street].
Evening Standard. 10 Sept 1888:
   All day yesterday, five policemen guarded the scene of the crime in Hanbury-street, to which hundreds of people obtained admission on Saturday, pay-
   ing a fee of one penny. No-one was admitted yesterday unless he resided in the house...  Thousands of respectably dressed persons visited the scene
   and,  occasionally,  the road became so crowded that the constables had to clear it by making a series of raids upon the spectators.   The windows of
   adjoining houses were full of persons watching the crowd below... At night, Hanbury-street was all but impassable from the crowds who had assembled
   on the scene of the murder.

Daily News. 11 Sept 1888:
   A great crowd stood in front of it [29 Hanbury St] extending a considerable way up and down the street. Nearly one half of the persons in it were women,
   most of them bare-headed and unwashed, and a great many with children in their arms.    From the windows of upper storeys on both sides of Hanbury-
   street, other women leant out, their elbows or outstretched palms resting on the windowsills...    the crowd stood patiently in the street, and stared hour
   after hour - a living monument to the innate impulse of wonder and curiousity.

East London Advertiser: 15 Sept 1888:
   On Sunday, crowds thronged Hanbury-street and the adjoining thoroughfares. In Hanbury-street, near the scene of the murder, a large number of persons
   had assembled as early as 9 o`clock [on Monday morning].

                                 BERNER STREET: site of the murder of Elizabeth Stride on Sun 30 Sept 1888.
Daily News. 2 Oct 1888:
   During the working dinner hour, people poured down into the neighbourhood [round Berner St] in a continuous stream...    a densely packed crowd stood
   before the closed gates besides the International Club
.
East London Observer. 6 Oct 1888:
   thousands of people gathered about the streets, and stood watching with the same morbid curiousity... All that could be seen [in Berner St] was the big
   wooden gates, inside which the woman Watts [sic - Elizabeth Stride] had met her death, guarded by a large force of police.  Here, too, windows were in
   great demand...  Apparently, the denizens of West London have begun to take a lively interest in the doings of the Whitechapel murderer, for, since Sun-
   day, a very large number of cabs and private carriages containing sightseers have visited the scenes of the tragedies
.
.

                                  MITRE SQUARE: site of the murder of Catherine Eddowes on Sun 30 Sept 1888
Daily News. 2 Oct 1888:
   All the points of interest in connection with the two tragedies  [murder of Elizabeth Stride in Berner Street, see above; and murder of Catherine Eddowes
   in Mitre Square]  were yesterday thronged all day.  A large force of City police were on duty in Mitre-square regulating the movements of the hundreds of
   people, who, hour after hour, kept thronging around the scene of the murder...  All day long, there were, yesterday, mobs assembled in the vicinity of the
   two dead-houses in which the victims at present laid.

East London Observer. 6 Oct 1888:
   At ten o`clock, Aldgate and Leatherhall-street, Duke-street, St James`s-place, and Hounds-ditch were all, literally, packed with human beings  - packed
   so tight that it was a matter of utter impossibility to pass through...  Every window of every inhabited room in the vicinity was thrown open for better view
   of the inmates; and seats at these windows were being openly sold and eagerly bought. Entrance to the square was strictly forbidden by the police who
   jealously guarded all three entrances and,  yet, great multitudes seemed to derive a kind of morbid satisfaction in standing ever so near the scene of the
   tragedy of a few hours before, and in gazing with a kind of awe upon so much of the dull flagstones of the square as they could see. As the day wore on,
   the crowds increased, considerably diminished between two and four o`clock and increasing again in the evening..
.

                                     MILLER`S COURT: site of the murder of Mary Jane Kelly on 9 Nov 1888.
Daily News. 10 Nov 1888:
   pedestrians were rigorously forbidden to approach anywhere near the house [13 Miller`s Court], in which the body [of Mary Jane Kelly] lay,  and cordons
   of police barred the way even into the street from which Miller`s Court opens...  news [of the murder] had spread so rapidly that over a thousand persons
   gathered in the street,  these were rapidly cleared away from the court, and the side of Dorset-street adjoining...    excitement in the neighbourhood was
   spreading, until the dwellers in the immediate locality became worked up into a perfect frenzy.  Women rushed about the streets, telling their neighbours
   the news... facts of the crime soon drew a great concourse of people to the thoroughfare, from which the court runs...   The streets were patrolled by the
   police all last evening, and no-one was allowed to loiter near the place.  At night, the neighbourhood was a scene of restless excitement and activity, the
   streets being filled with thousands of idlers.
.