THE POLICE

 

          THE POLICE
History:
  Metropolitan Police force
  City of London Police
  Detective force and CID
Events before murders
Murder investigations.

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 THE POLICE

TIMELINE:
1829.
Robert Peel introduced the Metropolitan Police Bill, which became law, and the
Metropolitan Police force was formed. Colonel Charles Rowan, who had been in the Irish Constabulary, and Sir Richard Mayne, a barrister, were appointed as joint Justices of the Metropolitan Police. The Metropolitan Police District, a radius of seven miles of Charing Cross (excluding City of London), was divided, at the outset, into five Divisions [1]. By the
end of 1829, there were 7 Divisions [2].
1830. A further 10 Divisions created, bringing the total to 17 [2].
1836. Bow Street Horse Patrol attached to the Metropolitan Police [2].
1838. Marine Police and Bow Street Runners incorporated into Metropolitan Police [2].
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refs:
[1] Charles Tempest Clarkson & J Hall Richardson. Police! Leaderhalll Press. 1889.
[2] Metropoltan Police website (www.metpolicehistory.co.uk).
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                POLICE
- Timeline (see left)
- crimes before murders (link)

  METROPOLITAN POLICE
- Commissioners (link)
- Divisions: ranks (link)
- Officers involved in murder
     investigations (link).

 CITY OF LONDON POLICE
- Commissioners (link)
- Divisions: ranks (link)
- Officers involved in murder
     investigations (link).

  BACKGROUND TO THE METROPOLITAN POLICE & CITY OF LONDON POLICE FORCES
(source: Charles Tempest Clarkson and J Hall Richardson. Police! Leaderhall Press. 1889).

  Robert Peel, Home Secretary, introduced the Metropolitan Police Bill, which became law in 1829. Under the Act of 1829, two persons were appointed  "to execute the duties of a justice". These two justices, Colonel Rowan, who had been in the Irish Constabulary, and Sir Richard Mayne, a barrister, drew up a list of regulations for the police force in the Metropolitan district, operating in a seven miles radius round Charing Cross, excluding the City of London.
  At the outset, five divisions of the Metropolitan Police were formed, with a total force of 825 men. Each division had a local name and letter, and consisted of one Superintendent, four inspectors, 16 Sergeants and 144 Constables. Each of the four Inspectors had a party of four Sergeants, each of the four Sergeants had a party of nine Constables, and each Constable was assigned eight beats, with one man remaining at the station as a reserve.
  In 1832, the Metropolitan Police comprised of 135 butchers, 109 bakers, 198 shoemakers, 51 tailors, 402 soldiers, 1154 labourers, 205 servants, 141 carpenters, 75 bricklayers, 55 blacksmiths, 20 turners, 152 clerks, 141 shopmen, 141 superior mechanics, 46 plumbers and painters, 101 sailors, 51 weavers, 8 stonemasons.
  Each Constable wore a blue suit; a single-breasted coat, with a row of white buttons, with a crown and "Police", and
a high leather collar, with an embroidered loop bearing his number and the letter of his division; a belt, fastened with a brass buckle; "peg-top" trousers; a pair of "half-Wellington" boots; and a tall "chimney-pot" hat, with a shiny glazed leather top. In the summer, a constable wore a "swallow-tailed" blue coat, with bright metal buttons; white "duck" trousers; and white "Berlin" gloves. Constables carried a rattle to call for assistance; and were armed with a staff or baton, marked with "Police Office". 

  The justices of the Metropolitan Police became Commissioners in 1839. Colonel Rowan and Sir Richard Mayne became joint Commissioners of the Metropolitan Police.
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EVENTS BEFORE THE MURDERS
  inc Fenian bombings;
  "Bloody Sunday"
  Trafalgar Square 1887

  read more... click here

POLICE OFFICERS
  in murder investigations
  - profiles; ranks
 
  read more... click here.