SUSPECTS:
U

UN-NAMED:
- seen with victim prior to murder; suspicious characters; arrests; self-confessions - by date:

Fri 31 Aug 1888
- 3am, a man was seen buying a woman a coffee at a coffee stall in Cambridge Street by the stall-keeper. As the woman he had seen appeared to answer the description of the woman murdered in Buck`s Row, who`s body was discovered at 3.45am, the stall-keeper went to Bethnal Green Police Station and, on the morning of Sat 1 Sept, was taken to where the post-mortem was being carried out, and viewed the body of Mary Ann Nichols, but he was unsure if she was the woman he had seen at the coffee-stall. The stall-keeper described the man he had seen with the woman as 5ft 3-4ins, aged 35, with a black moustache and whiskers, wearing a dark coat and a black Derby hat (The Star. Sat 1 Sept 1888).

Fri 7 Sept 1888
- 11.45pm, a man was arrested on suspicion in City Road. Six police officers took the un-named man to Kingland Rd Police Station. (The Star. Sat 8 Sept 1888)
.

Sat 8 Sept 1888
- 5am
, a man entered the Ten Bells public house, corner of Spitalfields Market, and called for a woman (Annie Chapman). E Waldon, proprietor of the Ten Bells,
said the man was wearing a little skull cap and no coat. (The Star. Sat 8 Sept 1888).
- 5.30am, a man was seen talking to a woman (identified as Annie Chapman) near 29 Hanbury Street (the scene of the murder) by Mrs Elizabeth Long, of 198 Church Road, Whitechapel, who said she did not see the man`s face but he was slightly taller than the woman, aged over 40, of foreign appearance, wearing a dark coat and brown deerstalker hat. (The Times. Thurs 20 Sept 1888). The man was also seen talking to the woman (Annie Chapman) in Hanbury Street by Rosetta Anderson, who said, in her statement on Fri 21 Sept 1888, that she had been on her doorstep, when she saw them, and said the man`s appearance resembled that of a foreigner, and he behaved in a suspicious and eccentric manner. (Belfast Newsletter. Fri 21 Sept 1888).
- 7am
, a man entered the Prince Albert public house, known as the "Clean House", at the corner of Brushfield Street and Stewart Street, and went into the middle compartment at the bar. He noticed that Mrs Chappell, in the first compartment, was watching him, turned his back on her and drew the partition between them. Mrs Fiddymont, the wife of the proprietor of the Prince Albert, noticed, in the mirror behind the bar, that the man had blood stains on the back of his right hand and his shirt was torn. Mrs Chappell saw the man leave and go towards Bishopsgate Street and asked Joseph Taylor, a builder, of 22 Stewart Street, to follow him. which he did, but lost sight of the man at "Dirty Dick`s" in Halfmoon Street. The Star reported, on Sat 8 Sept 1888, Mrs Chappell had said that the man was wearing a blue check shirt, torn at the shoulder; Mrs Fiddymont had said he was wearing a dark coat, no waistcoat, and a brown stiff hat; and Joseph Taylor said the man was 5ft 8ins, aged 40-50, with short sandy hair and ginger moustache, wearing a dark coat and pepper and salt trousers. (The Star. Sat 8 Sept 1888). Taylor, later, changed and added to his description of the man, and said he was aged 30-40, neither stout nor thin, with a long neck, square shoulders, and ginger moustache. (The Star. Mon 10 Sept 1888). On Mon 10 Sept 1888, Mrs Fiddymont, Mrs Chappell and Joseph Taylor went to Commerical Street Police Station to see if they could identify William Henry Piggott [see SUSPECTS - P - PIGGOTT] as the suspicious man seen in the Prince Albert public house on Sat 8 Sept. Piggott was placed in an identity parade. Mrs Fiddymont and Joseph Taylor declared that Piggott was not the man they had seen, Mrs Chappell picked out Piggott but failed to positively identify him. (The Star. Tues 11 Sept 1888).

- 12.30pm, two men, each accused of being the murderer by a mob, which threatened to lynch them, were taken by the police to Bethnal Green Police Station, where they were detained for their own protection. (The Star. Sat 8 Sept 1888).
- afternoon,
a man was seen, by the lavatory attendant of the lavatory of City News, 4 Ludgate Circus, changing his clothes in the lavatory. The man then left in a hurry, leaving behind a pair of trousers, a shirt, and a pair of socks. Later that afternoon, Mr Walker, the proprietor of City News, was informed and threw the left clothes into a dust box, which he put outside for collection by the City Sewer cart on Monday. The man, claiming to be a police constable, called at City News on Tues 11 Sept, and asked for the clothes, but Mr Walker told him he would have to go to the Commissioner of the City Sewers. On Thurs 13 Sept, Mr Walker was interviewed by the police. The lavatory attendant was found and said the man seen changing his clothes was aged 30, with dark moustache, and of respectable appearance. (Evening News. Tues 18 Sept 1888).
- 7pm, a man went into newsgaents in Grove Street, near the Foreign Cattle market, in Deptford and asked for a copy of The Star special. Told it was sold out, he asked for a copy of Evening News special, and when told it, too, was sold out, he asked for copy of any special. The newsagent offered the Standard he was reading. The man took the paper, dropped a penny on the counter, left the shop, and stood under the street lamp outside reading about the latest murder. The newsagent, regarding the man`s behaviour as suspicious, sent a boy, who was passing, to fetch a policeman. Before the policeman arrived, the man crushed up the newspaper, ran down Emily Place, and disappeared. The policeman arrived and took a statement from the newsagent, who said the man was stout, with ruddy complexion, slight moustache, scruffy beard or several days` growth, wearing a well-worn brown overcoat and an old felt hat. On Sun 9 Sept, a man was arrested in Deptford, on suspicion of being connected with the East End murders. The next day, it was thought his innocence would be established and he would be released. (The Times. Mon 10 Sept 1888)..

Sat 8/Sun 9 Sept 1888
- night/early morning
, several men were taken to various Police Stations in the East End and detained on suspicion. The police made inquiries, and all were released. (The Times. Mon 10 Sept 1888).

Sun 9 Sept 1888
- day
, a man was arrested in Gloucester Street and taken to Commercial Street Police Station. From the appearance of the man, said to be a seafarer, aged 40, and his account, the police considered he was not to be the man wanted in connection with the murders, and he was released. (Belfast Newsletter. Mon 10 Sept 1888).
- 3pm,
a man met Mrs Lyons in Flower and Dean Street and he asked her if she would go for a drink with him. She agreed to meet him at the Queen`s Head public house, at 6.30pm. When they met, Mrs Lyons noticed a large knife in the right hand pocket of the man`s trousers and drew this to the attention of another woman. The man said "You are about the same style of woman as the one that`s murdered"; Mrs Lyons asked him, "what do you know about her?", he replied "You are beginning to smell a rat. Foxes hunt geese, but they don`t always find `em", then left the Queen`s Head. Mrs Lyons followed the man, but near Spitalfields Church, he turned, saw her, quickened his pace, went into Church Street, and she lost sight of him. Mrs Lyons said the man was "identical with published descriptions" of "Leather Apron" [see "LEATHER APRON"] (The Times. Mon 10 Sept 1888).

Mon 10 Sept 1888
- shortly after 1am, a man was arrested on suspicion in Buck`s Row and taken to Bethnal Green Police Station. He was said to have a long knife concealed but, when he was searched, no knife was found. He was described as villaneous-looking, with long hair and shaggy beard, wearing ragged blue trousers and a dirty old shirt. Police inquiries established he was a common vagrant and he was released from custody. (Belfast Newsletter. Mon 10 Sept 1888).
- night/early morning, seven men were taken into custody on suspicion in different parts of the East End. The police made brief investigations, all seven were found to have no connection with the murders and were released. (The Star. Mon 10 Sept 1888).
- 10.30pm, a man, allegedly, frightened and threatened a woman in Heath Street, Commercial Street East. According to newspaper reports, Mrs Lloyd was standing outside a neighbour`s door in Heath Street and heard her daughter scream. A man had stared into the face of her daughter, who had seen he had a large knife at his side. The man was described as short, with a sandy beard, and wearing a cloth cap. (The Star; Evening News. Fri 14 Sept 1888). Following publication of the story, Mrs Lloyd told a Star reporter she had not given her permission for her story to be published and newspapers had exaggerated it. She said she could not say if the man had a knife, the man had not attempted to stab her daughter, and that she had been asked to go to Commercial Street Police Station to identify a man, but could not swear to recognizing him. (The Star. Sat 15 Sept 1888).

Fri 14 Sept 1888
- 10pm
, a man passed through Tower subway, from Surrey side to Middlesex side, and asked the caretaker, "Have you caught any of the Whitechapel murderers yet?" The man then produced a 1ft long knife with a curved blade, said, "This will do for them", and then ran off. The caretaker followed the man, but lost sight of him near Tooley Street. The man was described as 5ft 3ins, aged 30, with a dark complexion, dark hair and moustache, false whiskers, wearing a new diagonal suit, light dustcoat, and dark cloth double-peaked cap. (Evening New. Sat 15 Sept 1888).

Fri 21 Sept 1888
- 2am
, a man, seen talking to a woman near Great Pearl Street, was questioned by a detective. After some unpleasantness, the detective told the man to accompany him to the police station. The man produced his warrant card to show he was a police officer, and was released. (Belfast Newsletter. Fri 21 Sept 1888).

Sat 22 Sept 1888
- time unknown
, a man was arrested in Holloway on suspicion and he was detained at Bow Asylum. The man`s brother gave an account of the man`s whereabouts on the morning of the murder (of Annie Chapman on 8 Sept). The police considered this was a satisfactory explanation and the man`s release was expected shortly. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Sat 22 Sept 1888).

Thurs 27 Sept 1888
- time unknown
, a man was arrested in Portsmouth by the local police, who considered the man was connected to the murders in Whitechapel. From the inquiries made, it was discovered that the man had assaulted a woman, for which he appeared in court and was bound over to keep the peace. (Evening News. Fri 28 Sept 1888).

Sat 29 Sept 1888
- 10.30pm
, a man went into a public house in Batty Street and, in conversation about the Whitechapel murders, he said he knew the murderer and that the people would hear about him again in the morning, and then the man left. The man was said to be aged about 35.
(The Star. Mon 1 Oct 1888).

- 11pm, a man was seen with a woman in Bricklayer`s Arms, Settlers Street, by J Best of 82 Lower Chapman Street. Best thought the man looked suspicious and said to the woman, "that`s "Leather Apron" getting round you". Later, Best was taken to the mortuary and identified the body of Elizabeth Stride as the woman he had seen with a man in Bricklayer`s Arms. Best described the man as an Englishman, 5ft 5ins, with "sore eyes", no eyelashes, thick black moustache, no beard, wearing a black morning suit, black coat, billycock hat, collar and tie. John Gardner of 11 Chapman Street corrobarated Best`s account (Evening News. Mon 1 Oct 1888).

- 11.53pm, a woman went into the Three Nuns Hotel, Aldgate and asked Albert Bachert, of 13 Newnham Street, Whitechapel, if he wanted to buy some matches. Bachet said "No" and the woman left. A man, who had earlier asked Bachert about the murders, what sort of "loose" women used the bar, when they usually left the street outside, and where they went, then asked him if he thought the woman, who had tried to sell matches and had left, would go with him down Northumberland Alley, a court off Fenchurch Street. The man went outside, spoke to the woman, returned and said "Good night" to Bachert and left the Three Nuns at 12.10am on Sunday morning (30 Sept). Bachert described the man as 5ft 6-7ins, aged 38, dark, wearing a dark morning coat, black tie, black felt hat, and carrying a black shiny bag. (The Times. Mon 1 Oct, Tues 2 Oct 1888).

Sun 30 Sept 1888
- 12.45am
, a man was seen at the corner of Berner Street and Commercial Street, by Israel Schwarz, a Hungarian, who gave his account, through an interpreter, to a Star reporter. Schwartz said the man, who was in front of him, stopped to speak to a woman, pushed her into a passage, and he heard them quarrel; and he then saw a second man come out of a public house and shout a warning to the man with the woman.
Schwarz said the man with the woman was stout, aged 30, with a brown moustache, wearing dark clothes and a felt hat; and the second man was taller, not as stout, with a red moustache, holding a knife. (The Star. Mon 1 Oct 1888).

- early morning, a man was taken into custody, after the police had been called to 22 Batty Street by the landlady, who had been asked by a man, who had returned to the lodging house in the early morning of the murders, to wash a shirt for him and she had noticed that the wrists and sleeves of the shirt were saturated with blood. The police also took away the shirt. After the man had given the police a satisfactory explanation, he was released. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Tues 16 Oct/Wed 17 Oct 1888).

- shortly before midnight, a man was arrested on suspicion at Stones End Police Station, Blackman Street, Borough, after the deputy keeper of Albert Chambers lodging house, suspicious of the man`s behaviour, had called the police. The man had entered the lodging house that morning, had stayed all day, and his manner had attracted the attention of the other lodgers. A police officer had arrived and had questioned the man, who had said he had spent the night of Sat 29 Sept on Blackfriars Bridge. The man was described as tall, dark, wearing an American hat. (The Times. Mon 1 Oct 1888). After being detained for 30 minutes, and having given an account of himself, the man was released, and returned to Albert Chambers lodging house. (The Times. Tues 2 Oct 1888).





ANGEL ALLEY SUSPECT:
On Mon 26 Nov 1888, a man was seen with woman in Angel Alley, Whitechapel. As the man resembled the description circulated of the person wanted in connection with the murders, he was followed, ran out of the alley, went into a public house, was arrested and taken to Commercial Street Police Station. He established his innocence and was released. (Evening News. Mon 26 Nov 1888).


BACKCHURCH LANE SUSPECT:
On Mon 1 Oct 1888, shortly before daylight, a man, dressed as a woman, was arrested in Backchurch Street, on corner of Cannon Street, taken to Leman Street Police Staion and held in custody. The man said he had walked from Leystonstone and he had hoped his disguise would help provide information about the murderer. His release was expected shortly. (The Star. Mon 1 Oct 1888).

BAKER`S ROW SUSPECT:
On Mon 8 Oct 1888, a man was arrested in Baker`s Row, Whitechapel, after a struggle, was taken to Bethnal Green Police Station, and charged on suspicion. After inquiries, he was arrested for stealing an oil cask. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Tues 9 Oct 1888).

BATTERSEA SUSPECT:
On Thurs 16 Nov 1888, a man entered coffee house in Battersea and displayed hair congealed with blood, which the man said was human hair. No-one detained the man. His appearance was said to be that of the description of the man wanted in connection with the murder of Mary Jane Kelly. Battersea Police searched for the man. (Evening News. Fri 16 Nov 1888).



BIRMINGHAM SUSPECT:
On Sat 17 Nov 1888, a man was arrested at Euston Station, London when he arrived that afternoon by train from Birmingham. He was questioned by police, described himself as a doctor, and gave an account of his whereabouts at the time of the murders. His statements were investigated and he was subsequently released. (The Times, The Star. Mon 19 Nov 1888).

BISHOP STORTFORD SUSPECT:
On Fri 5 Oct 1888, a man, who`s appearance matched the description circulated by the Metropolitan Police of the person wanted in connection with the Whitechapel murders, was arrested on suspicion at Tiptree Heath, Bishop Stortford, objected to being searched by Police Sergeant Cresswell, was taken to Kelvedon Police Station, and detained in custody. (Evening News. Fri 5 Oct 1888). 



CABLE STREET SUSPECT:
On Wed 3 Oct 1888, a man accosted a woman in Cable Street, asked her to go with him, and told her that if she refused, he would "rip her up". The woman screamed and the man rushed off to a cab. A policeman gave chase, seized the man in the cab, and took him to Leman Street Police Station, where he refused to give his name, and was arrested on suspicion of being the Whitechapel murderer. The man was said to be an American. (The Times. Wed 3 Oct 1888).


CHURCH LANE SUSPECT:
On Sun 30 Sept 1888, at 1am, a man was seen sitting, wiping his hands, on a doorstep in Church Lane. The man was said to have looked suspicious and was wearing a short jacket and sailor`s hat. (The Star. Mon 1 Oct 1888).




"CLEAN HOUSE", PRINCE ALBERT PUB SUSPECT (2):
On Sat 10 Nov 1888, at 11pm, a man was seen talking to a young woman in the Prince Albert public house, known as the "Clean House", at corner of Brushfield Street and Stewart Street. The man asked the woman to accompany him up a court, and when she refused, he left the public house. Peter Maguire followed the man, who noticed he was being followed and went into Spitalfields. Maguire continued to follow him. The man went up a court, took off his gloves, put on another pair, went to Shoreditch and got on a `bus. Maguire, who had seen this, asked a policeman to stop the `bus, but the policeman refused. Maguire met another policeman, who stopped the `bus, found the man huddled in a corner, and took the man to Commercial Street Police Station. The man was detained on suspicion, pending further inquiries. (The Star. Mon 12 Nov 1888).

COMMERCIAL STREET SUSPECT (1):
On Sun 30 Sept 1888, at 10pm, a man was arrested, on suspicious behaviour, in Commercial Street by a police constable, taken to the police station, was questioned by the Duty Inspector, and gave an account of his whereabouts on the night of Sun 29 Sept and early morning of Mon 30 Sept. The man`s statement was verified and he was released. (The Star. Mon 1 Oct 1888).

COMMERCIAL STREET SUSPECT (2):
On Wed 3 Oct 1888, at 4am, a man with blood-covered hands was seen at a coffee stall in Commercial Street. A police constable was called, the man was examined the man, the cause of blood on the man`s hands was determined, and the man was not detained in custody. (Evening News. Wed 3 Oct 1888).

COMMERCIAL STREET SUSPECT (3):
On Sun 7 Oct 1888, at some time during that night, a suspicious man was seen in Commercial Street, was followed by two private detectives, arrested and taken into custody. Two razors were found in his black bag, and, although he gave two false addresses, he explained his movements and the police considered there was no reason to detain him. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Mon 8 Oct 1888).


DORSET STREET SUSPECT (1):
On Sat 10 Nov 1888, at 3am, a man was seen in Dorset Street by two youths, who followed him into Houndsditch. Near Bishopsgate Street, the youths spoke to a policeman, who took the man to Bishopsgate Police Station, where he was searched and a pocket medical chest, containing small bottles of chloroform, was found; and he was then taken to Commercial Street Police Station and detained, and then taken to Marlborough Street Police Station for identification. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Sun 11 Nov 1888). The man was described as 5ft 8ins, of foreign appearance with a long pointed moustache, wearing a long black overcoat and cloth deerstalker hat. After inquiries, the man was allowed to go. (The Star. Mon 12 Nov 1888).

DORSET STREET SUSPECT (2):
On Mon 12 Nov 1888, at 3am, a man was arrested in Dorset Street and taken to Commercial Street Police Station. Refusing to satisfy the police of his movements, he was still in custody at 8am. (The Star. Mon 12 Nov 1888). 

DOVER SUSPECT:
On Wed 14 Nov 1888, a suspicious-looking man, who`s appearance was said to resemble the description of the person wanted in connection with the Whitechapel murders, was seen near Dover Railway Station. He was arrested and taken into custody, and was later, released. (The Star; Evening News. Thurs 15 Nov 1888).

DUKE  STREET SUSPECT:
On Sun 30 Sept 1888, in the early hours of the morning, the voices of a man and woman were heard in Duke Street by Mrs Lindsay of 11 Duke Street, opposite Church Passage, who said the man had said, in anger, "I am not the murderer", and she then saw the 
man disappear down the street towards Aldgate, and described the man as average height, wearing dark clothes, and carrying an umbrella and a small parcel. (The Star. Mon 1 Oct 1888). The next day, another account was published of the man and woman in Duke Street at 1.40am on Sun 30 Sept, describing the man as 5ft 9ins, aged 30, with a fair complexion and small fair moustache, was of shabby appearance, and was wearing a red neckerchief and a cap with a peak. (The Times. Tues 2 Oct 1888).

ELHAM SUSPECT:
On Thurs 11 October 1888, a man, a casual worker at a workhouse, was arrested in Eltham, near Hyde, after the master of the workhouse had noticed that the casual worker`s appearance answered the description of the man wanted in connection with the Whitechapel murders and informed the police. When questioned, the casual worker gave three or four different names and made contradictory statements as where he was from. He was said to have been dressed in genteel style, wearing a black coat, black trousers, a shirt, and a black hat. The trousers and shirt had blood on them, and the cuffs of the shirt had been ripped off. It was believed, that after further inquiries, the man would be released. (The Times. Fri 12 Oct 1888).

FAVERSHAM SHIP SUSPECT:
On Sat 13 Oct 1888, an Austrian seaman, on board a Faversham ship in the Tyne, signed articles. Superintendent Farmer of River Tyne Police received information and when the signature on the articles signed by the Austrian seaman was found to correspond with the writing on the facsimiles of the "Jack the Ripper" letters. (The Times. Tues 16 Oct 1888).

GEORGE YARD SUSPECT:
On Sun 11 Nov 1888, at 8.45pm, on the second floor of the George Yard buildings, a man passed Mrs Humphries, who being nearly blind, asked who it was but, as the man stuttered, his reply was unintelligable, Mrs Humphries, having heard stories about "Jack the Ripper", cried, in fear, "Murder", "Police". Police Sergeant Irving and PC 22H arrived, rushed into the building, and found that the man was the boyfriend of Mrs Humphries` daughter and was visiting her, and peace was restored. (The Star. Mon 12 Nov 1888).


GORDON CHAMBERS SUSPECT:
On Mon 22 Oct 1888, in the morning, a man called at a lodging house in Gordon Chambers, near Bow Church, and asked if he could go in and wash. He went in, washed stains out of his waistcoat, which he placed it in front of the fire to dry, and then went out. His behaviour raised suspicions and the police were called. In the early morning of the next day, Tues 23 Oct 1888, the man, said to be middle-aged, was arrested and taken to Bow Road Police Station. (The Star. Tues 23 Oct 1888).


HAGGERSTON SUSPECT:
On Tues 9 Oct 1888, a man, seen acting suspiciously during police inquiries at a lodging house in Haggerston, was arrested, taken to Commercial Street Police Station and released after an hour and a half in custody. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Wed 10 Oct 1888).




KING STREET SUSPECT:
On Tues 16 Oct 1888, at 9pm, a man entered King Street Police Station and complained of having lost a bag. The man said he had studied in the medicine profession for some years but gave it up for engineering. While the police officer was taking notes, the man spoke about the women who had been murdered in Whitechapel, then threatened to cut off the Police Sergeant`s head. Dr Bond, police surgeon, was sent for and pronounced the man a dangerous lunatic with homicidal tendency. The man`s appearance was said to resemble the description of a man seen with women in the East End on different occasions, and he was aged 67, strong build, wearing a serge suit and hard felt hat. Photographs were taken of the man and the man`s handwriting was said to be similar to that on the letters sent to the police. The man was removed to Bow Street. (The Times. Thurs 18 Oct 1888).

LEMAN STREET SUSPECT (1):
On Sun 14 Oct 1888, a man was arrested that night in Leman Street, and detained on suspicion at the police station. Some time after, he was discharged. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Mon 15 Oct 1888).

LEMAN STREET SUSPECT (2):
On Tues 16 Oct 1888, a man was arrested that night in Leman Street, and detained. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Thurs 18 Oct 1888).

LIMARY SUSPECT:
On Mon 15 Oct 1888, a man was arrested in Limary, near Limerick, Ireland, on suspicion of having committed the murders in the East End of London, and was taken to the police station by PC Walsh, where he refused to give his name or any information about himself. He was described as having a travel-stained appearance, was wearing a slouched hat, carried a black leather bag, and spoke with a slight American accent. (The Times. Tues 16 Oct 1888).

MARKET HARBOROUGH SUSPECT:
On Thurs 15 Nov 1888, a man was arrested, that night, in Market Harborough, on suspicion of being connected with the murders in Whitechapel. He was said to have been living in the area for two months, but was frequently absent from the lodging house where he had been staying, and was very dark, swarthy-looking, and spoke with a slight foreign accent. (The Star. Fri 16 Nov 1888).

MITRE SQUARE SUSPECT:
On Wed 3 Oct 1888, a man approached a police officer, that evening, and said he "had assisted in the Mitre Square job". He was taken to Leman Street Police Station, where he was found to be suffering from delerium tremens, and he was detained overnight. The next day, Thurs 4 Oct, at 10am, he was released. (The Star. Thurs 4 Oct 1888).        

NELSON TAVERN SUSPECT:
On Mon 1 Oct 1888, at the Nelson Tavern public house, Victoria Road, Kentish Town, the proprietor noticed a paper parcel behind the door of the lavatory. At 10am, that morning, Mr Chinn, the publican, was reading a newspaper, when he saw the parcel, and thought it was similar to the one that the police had described as being in the possession of the man seen with Elizabeth Stride. Kentish Town Police were informed. A detective arrived at Nelson Tavern and found the parcel, which contained a pair of blood-stained trousers, the colour of which matched the description of those worn by the suspected man. (The Times. Tues 2 Oct 1888).

PINCHIN STREET SUSPECTS:
On Tues 10 Sept 1889, three men, who were sleeping under an arch, adjoining the site of the murder and used as a stone yard, were arrested and detained. After being questioned, all three were released. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Wed 11 Sept 1888).



ST GEORGE`S-IN-THE-EAST INFIRMARY SUSPECT:
.On Tues 9 Oct 1888, women inmates of the wards of St George`s-in-the-East Infirmary, informed a Star reporter that they were positive that they could provide information about the murders. One inmate, referred to only as "Jenny" had told Dr Saunders that, if she was well enough, she could find and identify the murderer, who frequently mistreated women of the street (i.e. prostitutes) and extorted money from them by threats of "ripping them up". "Jenny" said the man was a foreigner, had been a doctor, was aged 40, well-dressed, and carried a big heavy stick. (The Star. Wed 10 Oct 1888). 


THOMAS A`BECKET PUB SUSPECT:
On Wed 14 Nov 1888, a man left the Thomas A`Becket public house that evening, leaving behind a shiny black bag. The police were informed, arrived at the pub, examined the bag and found that it contained a very sharp dagger, a clasp knife, and two pairs of very long, odd-looking, scissors. The man was arrested in Old Kent Road and taken into custody. (The Star. Thurs 15 Nov 1888).


TOWER OF LONDON SUSPECT:
On Tues 23 Oct 1888, a man was arrested near the Tower Of London, and detained. (Aberdeen Weekly News, Wed 24 Oct 1888).


WALWORTH SUSPECT:
On Sat 13 Oct 1888, during the afternoon, a man was arrested on suspicion in Walworth, and taken to the police station. Some time later, the man was discharged. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Mon 15 Oct 1888).

WENTWORTH STREET SUSPECT:
On Sat 10 Nov 1888, at 10pm, a man, proclaiming himself "Jack the Ripper" on the corner of Wentworth Street and Commercial Street, was seized by two young men (one a discharged soldier), and, while he was being held, was attacked by a crowd, who were crying "Lynch him". A police officer took the man to Leman Street Police Station. The man said he was a doctor at St George`s Hospital. He was said to be 5ft 7ins, aged 35, with a moustache, wore glasses, and had a double-peaked cap in his pocket. As his appearance was said to match the police description of the man wanted in connection with the Whitechapel murders, the man was detained in custody. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Sun 11 Nov 1888).

WEST NORWOOD SUSPECT:
On Sun 30 Sept 1888, a man was arrested that night, at the coffee shop, opposite Thurlow Arms public house, West Norwood, on suspicion, as his face was scratched and he had blood marks on his clothes. (The Star. Mon 1 Oct 1888).

WHITECHAPEL AREA SUSPECT (1)
On Thurs 18 Oct 1888, a man was arrested on suspicion in the Whitechapel area from information received. He was said to be aged about 35 and recently was living in Whitechapel. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Fri 19 Oct 1888).

WHITECHAPEL AREA SUSPECT (2):
On Wed 24 Oct 1888, a man, seen with a woman and behaving suspiciously in Whitechapel, was arrested that morning, and taken to Leman Street Police Station, but the police attached no importance. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Thurs 25 Oct 1888).

WHITECHAPEL AREA SUSPECT (3):
On Sat 11 Oct 1890, the Chair of the Vigilance Committee in Whitechapel gave an account to the Daily Chronicle of a statement by a middle-aged woman, who had been living in model dwellings in Whitechapel two years ago (i.e. 1888). The woman had said a young man had taken an unfurnished room at the model dwellings, saying he could afford the rent as he received an allowance from his brother, a doctor, and from his father, and the young man had often gone out at all hours of the night, and, on several occasions, she had noticed the towels were bloodstained, and the man had it said was paint, as he was a painter. The woman had added she had seen the man with a parcel of liver, which he had said he had got from a friend on board a New Zealand boat, pack the liver into a box and address it to the Chairman of the then Vigilance Committee, and place other pieces of liver in envelopes, which he had intended to send to the Central News Agency, Press Association, and the police, but he had forgotten about them, had never sent them, and she had thrown the pieces away. The woman said the man had several brass rings and he had brought home a white blood-stained apron, which he had given to her and which she still had. The woman also recalled that on Wed 17 Jul 1889, the morning of the murder in Castle Alley, the man had left a model dwelling in Whitechapel, and had left behind a long overcoat and several bags, all of which were blood-stained, and a pair of "silent" shoes. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Mon 13 Oct 1890). 

WHITECHAPEL ROAD SUSPECT:
On Wed 14 Nov 1888, a man was seen in Whitechapel Road, staring into the face of a woman, who screamed that the man was Jack the Ripper. He was surrounded by a crowd, and was then taken by the police to Commercial Street Police Station, where he said he was German and explained, through an interpreter, that he had arrived in London from Germany on Tues 13 Nov and was due to leave for America on Thurs 15 Nov. His statement was confirmed and he was released. (The Star. Thurs 15 Nov 1888).

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  In addition, other un-named men were suspected at unspecified places, on various dates, and arrested or detained:

On Sun 30 Sept/Mon 1 Oct 1888, five men were arrested on suspicion - three taken to Leman Street Police Station, where one was released, one was detained and released at 12 noon on Mon 1 Oct, one detained and released in afternoon of Mon 1 Oct; and two taken to Commercial Street Police Station, where one was released soon after his arrest, and one [see SUSPECTS - R - RAPER] was kept in custody. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Tues 2 Oct 1888).   

On Wed 3 Oct 1888, two men were detained on suspicion that night at Leman Street Police. (The Times. Thurs 4 Oct 1888) or -
three men were arrested that night, and released from the police station the next day (Aberdeen Weekly News. Sat 6 Oct 1888).

On Sat 6/Sun 7 Oct 1888, twelve men were arrested (Press Association telegraph. Sun 7 Oct 1888), in most cases on information by private residents, all were released. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Mon 8 Oct 1888).

On Thurs 15/Fri 16 Nov 1888, 14 men were arrested on suspicion, during the night and early morning, and taken to East End police stations, and, after a short detection, all were released. (The Star. Fri 16 Nov 1888).

On Tues 20 Nov 1888, a man was arrested on suspicion in the East End. He was roughly used by the crowd and he refused to answer questions by the police. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Thurs 22 Nov 1888).

On Mon 17 Nov 1890, at the Sherrif`s Court, a motion was brought for release of a man, allegedly a London tobacco merchant, who was in an asylum in New York, USA, where he was alleged to be "Jack the Ripper". (Aberdeen Weekly News. Tues 18 Nov 1890).

Wed 11 Sept 1889,
- a man was arrested on suspicion at Arbour Square Station, and held in custody. (Aberdeen Weekly News. Wed 11 Sept 1889).
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